Using TRMM To Model Floods For The Upper Missouri Basin

By Goddard Upper Missouri River Disasters Team , posted on August 13th, 2012 in DEVELOP Virtual Poster Session

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A flow direction map of the Upper Missouri basin, derived in ArcMap from the digital elevation model (HydroSHEDS).

A flow direction map of the Upper Missouri basin, derived in ArcMap from the digital elevation model (HydroSHEDS).

Team Location: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland

Authors: Paul Skym, University of Maryland, College Park; David Spelman, University of Florida; Luciano Rodriguez, Chapman University

Advisors/Mentors: Frederick Policelli, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Dr. Dimitar Ouzonov, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Science Systems Applications Inc.; John David, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Science Systems Applications Inc.; Elizabeth Creamer, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Science Systems Applications Inc.; Katie Melocik, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Science Systems Applications Inc.; Maura Tokay, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Science Systems Applications, Inc.; Dan Slayback, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Science Systems Applications Inc.

Other Acknowledgements: Scott Cook, David Spelman, Luciano Rodriguez

Abstract: Focusing on calibration and validation, this project is a continuation of flood modeling from Upper Missouri River Disasters I. The study area, the Upper Missouri River basin within Montana, deals with flooding on a regular basis. With the goal of accurately forecasting floods, the DEVELOP team ran a fully distributed hydrological model using the University of Oklahoma’s Coupled Routing Excess STorage (CREST) 2.0 Model, incorporating various remotely sensed input variables to compare results with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Flood Extent Maps. For cross comparison purposes the team ran the CREST model in another study location, the San Bernard watershed in Texas. The model failed to calibrate. Analysis suggested that failure was due to a lack of snowmelt. The results of this project will be a baseline flood modeling capability for these watersheds for evaluation by the NOAA Severe Storms Laboratory. In addition, this new forecasting system should assist NOAA in operational forecasting.

Summer VPS > Disasters

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